Nintendo is releasing the NES Classic Edition this November. It includes 30 games and a controller for $60. If it does well, and there’s little reason to think it won’t, the next logical step may be to release an SNES Classic Edition. Going off the same concept, 30 games in a plug and play box, what could that lineup look like? I’m envisioning this console with HDMI output, two controllers in the box, and four ports on the console, no Super Multitap required.

My list includes 15 Nintendo published games and 15 3rd party published games. This post will cover the 15 Nintendo titles, and are numbered according to release year.

Just missing the cut here are games like Star Fox, Stunt Race FX, and both Donkey Kong Country sequels. I’m sure an actual Nintendo product would include Star Fox, but the original is awful and does not hold up at all visually. Stunt Race FX is a forgotten member of the polygonal Super FX chip lineup, I’d include it over Star Fox, but ultimately leave it out for the same graphical reasons. I include the original Donkey Kong Country, but didn’t find room for the sequels. I think Nintendo would try to include both over a couple of the third party games, but I strictly split the list in half.

1. F-Zero (1991)


It’s been 13 years since the last console F-Zero, but the characters have made consistent appearances in the Smash Bros. series.

2. Super Mario World (1991)


Any argument about the “best” Mario game typically comes down to this or Super Mario Bros. 3 on NES. No way this isn’t included on the SNES Classic Edition.

3. SimCity (1991)


The original SimCity launched on PC in 1989 and translated to SNES surprisingly well.

4. Pilotwings (1991)


A flight simulator of all sorts, from airplanes to jetpacks. This was one of only three launch titles, along with Super Mario World and F-Zero. A sequel, Pilotwings 64, would later launch alongside the Nintendo 64.

5. The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past (1992)


The Zelda franchise reached new heights with A Link to the Past, and was the only series entry on SNES. It would be another seven years before Ocarina of Time.

6. Super Mario Kart (1992)


This one birthed the kart racing genre, mixing go-kart racing with combat. It’s spawned numerous sequels and a myriad of imitators.

7. Donkey Kong Country (1994)


Before Donkey Kong Country, Donkey Kong was known only as the villain from his own titular games.

8. Super Punch-Out!! (1994)


The original is included on the NES Classic Edition, so you have to think the in-all-ways-superior sequel would be included on an SNES version. This may be a boxing game visually, but underneath the surface it’s really a rhythm game.

9. Super Metroid (1994)


The most beloved of the 2D Metroid games is a direct sequel to the Game Boy’s Metroid II: Return of Samus.

10. Earthbound (1995)


Earthbound is one of my all-time favorites, and the first of several RPGs on my list. Among it’s many unique traits are the modern setting in a genre that to this day is still overrun with knights and dragons.

11. Kirby’s Dream Course (1995)


A zany isometric mini golf game featuring Kirby should not be as good as this is.

12. Super Mario World 2: Yoshi’s Island (1995)


This sequel made Yoshis the playable characters as you escort baby Mario throughout the world, launching eggs as weapons.

13. Tetris Attack (1996)


A fast paced head-to-head puzzle game, this is sort of an early ancestor of today’s popular Match 3 games.

14. Super Mario RPG (1995)


Mario got his first RPG on the SNES, and it’s a classic. I still can’t believe this never got a real sequel. And no, the Paper Mario series doesn’t count.

15. Kirby’s Dream Land 3 (1997)


One of the last games released on the SNES, and the final Nintendo published game, was also the final Dream Land title to date.

Any Nintendo published games you’d put into this list that I didn’t? What would you take out of my list? Let me know in the comments and check back for games 16-30 all published by 3rd parties.

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